cyberpi_block_based_coding_basic_course_material

Makeblock / Tunniplaanid

Share on Social Networks

Share Link

Use permanent link to share in social media

Share with a friend

Please login to send this document by email!

Embed in your website

Select page to start with

37.   © education.makeblock.com      37   2. Some solutions may, at first, ap pear to be correct. But, encour age students to think  critically and fully  test their solution. For example, the following code does not p roperly graph the data. When testing this  code, you should observe that speaking loudly by the CyberPi ma kes both the red and blue lines  increase.    3. Encourage students to persevere t hrough fixing or debugging the ir code until they get the correct  solution. The following is a correct solution:                Wrap‐Up [5 minutes]   Documentation 

44.   © education.makeblock.com      44     2. Students may find it helpful to add the following script inside  the forever loop to s ee the values of the  variables on the CyberPi display:    Wrap‐Up  [5 minutes]   Variable Review  2. Discuss with students how variab les are used to store informati on in a variety of computing devices  and applications. Discuss the following examples with students:  

7.   © education.makeblock.com      7   1. Facilitate a discussion for students to share about their favor ite example projects. Encourage  students to identify the CyberPi  features and capabilities they  are most excited to learn about.  2. Have students document what they  hope to learn while completing  these lessons and any  questions they may have.  3. Now that students have seen some examples of the CyberPi in act ion, encourage them to  brainstorm ideas for a problem i n their daily life that they wa nt to solve using the CyberPi and  mBlock.    Lesson Extension(s)   If students need additional support using mBlock, consider havi ng the students complete the  mBlock 5 Getting Started Activities.      

26.   © education.makeblock.com      26   Project Documentation  1. Now that students have created a feature‐rich sound recorder, h ave them write a description for  their recorder that explains the  features they have included in  their design.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students collect feedback f rom a variety of stakeholders ( i.e., parents, teachers, friends,  etc.).   Have students add improvements t o a different student’s project .      

38.   © education.makeblock.com      38   1. When programming, it can be help ful to document programs to mak e them easier for someone to  follow, test and debug. Often, multiple programmers work on one  project. Instruct students to use a  comment(s) to explain how the code works.     Lesson Extension(s)   Have students program  the LEDs or speaker  to react to the loudn ess or light intensity.   Have students add a title and ga me instructions to the project.    Have students program  a sprite or background to change costumes  based on the loudness or light  intensity. (Note, a variable is  required to store each sensor v alue.)      

22.   © education.makeblock.com      22   [5 minutes]   Summarize  1. Have students share a few of the  ideas they incorporated into t heir sound records.  2. Remind students that t he next activity will have them continue  developing the Sound Recorder project  through an iterative process.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students explore UX Design  (User Experience Design) and th e role it plays in software  development.   Have students research accessibili ty and usability with softwar e development.      

10.   © education.makeblock.com      10    Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Input vs. Output  3. Discuss the following defini tions with the students.  Term  Definition* input  A device or component that allows  information to be given to a  computer.  output  Any device or component that  receives information from a  computer.  *Definitions from Co de.org – CSD Unit 1  4.  Using a smartphone as an exampl e, have students work in pairs  or small groups to create a list of the  input and output for a mobile phone. Some examples may include:   Smartphone  Input  Output Microphone  Touch Screen  Buttons  GPS  Motion Sensor (tilting the phone)  Light Sensor  Camera  Internet connection  Temperature Sensor  Charging Port  Bluetooth  Speaker  Screen / Display  Headphones  Vibration  Internet connection  LED (flashlight / camera flash)  Charging Port  Bluetooth      5. Have students reflect on Lesson 1 – Meet the CyberPi and create  a list of the input and output for the  CyberPi. Encourage students to r efer back to the product docume ntation included with the CyberPi if  they get stuck.      CyberPi 

55.   © education.makeblock.com      55   when a specific cloud broadcast is  received. Sends a cloud broadcast.  The CyberPi can communicate with a Halocode or an mBlock sprite  through Wi‐Fi cloud  broadcast.  Halocode    See description of CyberPi blocks  above.  Sprite   See description of CyberPi blocks  above.    LAN   A LAN (local‐area network) is a network that links a group of c omputers or devices within a  certain location. The group of c omputers share communications t o send messages to each  other. A local area network can be formed between CyberPi’s to  allow one CyberPi to control  another.  Category   Block   Function      Event block that triggers the  execution of the actions attached  when a specific LAN broadcast is  received.  Sends a LAN broadcast.    10. Select the type of communication that will work for with your c lassroom and students. Use the  following steps as an example o f how wireless communication wor ks in mBlock. 

20.   © education.makeblock.com      20       Starts recording audio.  Limited to a 10 second recording.    Stops recording audio.        Plays the last recording stored on  the CyberPi.    24. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.  25. Remind students how to drag‐and‐drop blocks from the color‐code d categories in the Block Area.  Instruct students to build the f ollowing scripts and test the p rogram:    26. Ask students if the device is ready to give to the classmate to  use in their foreign language class. Many  students will begin to identify  areas of improvement for this d esign. Have students brainstorm and  create a list of ways to improve  this basic sound recording dev ice. If students need additional guidance,  consider asking the following questions:  a. How will your classmate  know how to use the  CyberPi Sound Recor der?  b. How will your classmate know i f the CyberPi is recording?  c. What other features could be  useful for your classmate?  d. What other components of the Cybe rPi can be used to create a mo re feature‐rich solution?  (i.e., display, LED strip, speaker, motion sensor)  Try It  [20 minutes]   Plan and Create Sound Recorder 2.0 

12.   © education.makeblock.com      12   When middle joystick button is pressed: Stop all sounds and lights   21. Have students examine the pseudocode above and identify the inp ut and output for the program.  Sound Machine Project  Input  Output Button A  Button B  Joystick Middle Button  Speaker / Buzzer  LED(s)    Write the Program  1. Now that the program is planned,  it is time to learn about the  new blocks needed to program the  pseudocode.   Category   Block   Function    Specifies the action on the  CyberPi that triggers the  execution of the actions attached.      Loop Statement  Continuously execute the actions  nested inside the block.    Stops all scripts, including all  loops.      Play a note on the CyberPi buzzer  for a specified amount of time.    Frequency Range: 0 to 1000      Light all or an individual on‐board  LED a specified color.    Color Value Range: 0 to 255 

57.   © education.makeblock.com      57   1. Using the following problem statement, instruct students to pla n a solution to the  problem. There are  many ways to solve this problem;  one sample solution has been p rovided for you.  Gift Alarm   Problem   One of your friend’s birthday is  soon. This friend likes to sha ke  presents to try to figure out what is inside. You would like to  figure  how to make a silent alarm that  will notify you wirelessly if t he gift is  shaken.    How can mBlock, the CyberPi a nd/or the Halocode help you  determine if your frie nd shakes the present  you give them this  year?  Proposed  Solution  Program the Halocode to send a cloud message if it is shaken. Secure the Halocode and a batt ery pack inside the present before wrapping. Program the CyberPi to play a so und and flash LEDs if a cloud message is received indicating the gift was shaken. Bonus: Have a sprite in mBlock also shake when the gift is shaken.   2. Have students write  pseudocode for the  Gift Alarm  and then create the project   using their pseudocode  as a guide.                Wrap‐Up [5 minutes]   Brainstorming Ideas  

43.   © education.makeblock.com      43   greater than  the second value.  Returns TRUE or FALSE.    16.  Instruct students to build the following scripts and test the  program to observe the joystick up/down  controls increasing the red value of all of the LEDs:    Using a Conditional Statement  17. Remind students that the R, G, B values have a range of 0 to 25 5. With the program above, the  redValue  variable can be changed to a va lue that falls outside of that  range. We can use conditional  statements to control the minimu m and maximum values. Instruct  students to modify the code and  add the following conditional statements to the program:    Note, students can also add a block to set the brightness to 10 0% when the program starts.    18. Explain to the students how the conditional statements do not a llow the redValue to ever be greater  than 255 or less than 0.  Try It  [20 minutes]   Completing the Program  1. Instruct students to finish the program based on the pseudocode  provided earlier in the lesson. The  following is an example of a completed program: 

14.   © education.makeblock.com      14       Computer or CyberPi selects a  random value between the  specified range.    8. Modify the previous programs to include the following random bl ocks:    Note, these ranges correspond to  the range of values accepted f or each block.  9. Have students test the new progr am. Note, students can change t he seconds value in the play buzzer  block to a decimal if they wou ld like a faster buzzer sound.    Restart a CyberPi  10. Programming a button to restart the CyberPi can be a helpful to ol in upcoming lessons. So, guide  students through programming a b utton to manually restart the C yberPi.  Category   Block Function      Restarts or reboots the CyberPi  device. The CyberPi will play the  last program uploaded to the  device.    11. Instruct students to build the following script and test the pr ogram:    Try It  [20 minutes]   Create a Sound Machine  3. Provide students time to experiment with their existing code. E ncourage them to try different values  for the parameters  in the blocks. 

19.   © education.makeblock.com      19   22. Using the following problem stat ement, guide students through p lanning a solution to the problem. A  sample solution has been provided for you. Note, keep the initi al solution very simple. This will allow  for students to iterate and add features as they work on develo ping a feature‐rich sound recorder.  Sound Recorder 1.0 Problem   One of your classmates is taking  a foreign language class. They  would  like to practice their pronunciat ion of some of the vocabulary  learned  in class, but by the time they g et home, they forget how their  teacher  said the words.    How can the CyberPi be used to h elp your classmate with this  problem?  Proposed  Solution  Create a sound recording using t he CyberPi t o record the teacher pronouncing the words and then playback the recording when studying at home.   Pseudocode   When Button A is pressed: Start recording When the middle joystick button is pressed: Stop recording When Button B is pressed: Playback recording                 Create Sound Recorder 1.0  23. Now that the program is planned,  it is time to learn about the  new blocks needed to program the  pseudocode.   Category   Block Function 

36.   © education.makeblock.com      36       Stores a numerical value  representing the volume detected  by the sound sensor on the  CyberPi.    Charting the Sound Sensor  6. Introduce students to the blocks that are for creating a line c hart on the CyberPi:  Category   Block   Function      Plots a point on the line chart on  the CyberPi display.  Changes the horizontal spacing of  the line chart.    Sets the color of the line chart.    7. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.  8. Instruct students to build the following script and test the pr ogram:          Try It  [20 minutes]   Charting the Light Sensor  1. Challenge students to modify the  code to include a red line cha rt for the light intensity. The CyberPi  should show both charts at the same time. 

49.   © education.makeblock.com      49   Category   Block Function      Loop Statement  Execute the actions nested inside  the block until a condition is  TRUE.     Sets the timer on the CyberPi to  zero (0).      Returns a value representing how  strong the CyberPi is shaken.      Displays text on the CyberPi  display at a specified position and  size.    4. Instruct students to build the f ollowing scripts and test the p rogram to observe th e shaking strength  values:                    Keeping Score  5. Make a variable named  score   and   leave  For all sprites  selected. 

58.   © education.makeblock.com      58   4. Wireless communication and cloud  messages eliminate barriers su ch as cord length and device  location. With the cla ss, brainstorm a list of ideas for progra ms that could benefit from wireless  communication. Some ideas may include:   Weather station which reports to a separate device.   Survey collection device in a ma in location of the school which  reports results to the classroom.   Walkie talkie or text me ssaging between devices.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students develop  their own project using wireless communic ation.   Have students research networks  and the role they in society.     

3.   © education.makeblock.com      3    Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Meet the CyberPi  1. Guide students through an unboxi ng of the CyberPi. Show the stu dents the following components and  have students locate them in their CyberPi Kit:  a. CyberPi  b. USB‐C Cable  c. Pocket Shield (not included in Base Kit)  d. mBuild Sensors (not included in Base Kit)  2. Have students read the CyberPi box and the Quick Start Guide. T hen, have students write a short  summary listing what they have le arned so far about the feature s and capabilities of the CyberPi.  Hands‐On  [15 minutes]   Tour of mBlock 5  1. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version .  2. Introduce students to the following key areas of the software i nterface:     

11.   © education.makeblock.com      11   Input  Output  Microphone  Buttons (A, B & Home)  Joystick  Charging Port  Bluetooth  Motion Sensor (gyro)  Light Sensor  Volume/Sound Sensor  Speaker  Screen / Display  LED Strip  Indicator LED (shows charging & power on)    with Pocket Shield and mBuild Kit  Multi‐Touch Sensor  Slider  Ultrasonic Sensor  Third‐Party Sensors  Motors (encoder & servo)  LED Strip  Third‐Party Modules       Hands‐On  [15 minutes]   Plan a Program with Pseudocode  19. Discuss with the students the im portance of planning a program  before developing it in the software.  Introduce student to  pseudocode  which can be a helpful tool for planning an mBlock project.  Term  Definition  pseudocode  Written sequence of steps for a p rogram written in English or  the programmer’s native language.    20. Using the following project description, guide students through  writing the pseudocode for the project.  Sound Machine Project  Description   Create a project where the CyberPi continuously makes sound wit h  the A button and lights up the LEDs with the B button. Have the   middle joystick button sto p the sounds and lights. Pseudocode   When Button A is pressed: Forever set all the LE Ds a specified color When Button B is pressed: Forever Play the buzzer at a specified note

48.   © education.makeblock.com      48    Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Variable Review  30. Review variables with the class and explain how variables can b e used to keep track of a score in an  mBlock project. Review with students how to create a variable,  set a variable and change a variable in  mBlock.  Hands‐On  [15 minutes]   Detecting Strength  1. Review the following challenge and pseudocode with the students :  Strength Meter 1.0   Project  Description   Create a game where the user shakes the CyberPi for 10 seconds  and  earns a point for every time the shaking strength exceeds 50. Pseudocode   When Button B is pressed: Set the score to zero (0) Reset the timer Repeat for 10 seconds If shaking strength is greater than 50 then, Change the score by one (1) When Button A is pressed: Show the score on the CyberPi display   2. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.          3. Introduce students to th e following new blocks: 

21.   © education.makeblock.com      21   1. Explain to students that programmers and software developers im prove upon their solutions often.  (Note, this is why software apps  have updates and redesigns.) S oftware development is an iterative  process.  2. Using the list of improvements they created in the previous sec tion, have students identify the three  most important features they would like to add to the  Sound Recorder  program.  3. Have students describe and justify the features they will be ad ding. Then, have students write the  pseudocode for each feature. A  sample plan is provided below:  Sound Recorder 2.0 Feature #1   Add instructions to the display telling the user what buttons to press to control the CyberPi Sound Recorder. When the CyberPi starts up: Display on the screen: “Press A to start, Press joystick to stop, Press B to play” Feature #2  Use the LEDs to tell the user when the CyberPi is recording.   When Button A is pressed: Set all LEDs to display green Start recording When the middle joystick button is pressed: Set all LEDs to display red Stop recording When Button B is pressed: Set all LEDs to display blue Playback recording Feature #3  Add the ability to change the CyberPi’s volume. When the CyberPi starts up: Set the volume to 50% When the joystick is pulled up: Increase the volume by 10% When the joystick is pulled up: Decrease the volume by 10% Note, there are two example prog rams included with this lesson.  These should be for the teacher to  review. Students should be encouraged to brainstorm and create  a program from their own ideas.  4. Have students create the  Sound Recorder 2.0  using their pseudocode as a guide.  Wrap‐Up 

45.   © education.makeblock.com      45    Fitness trackers stores the number of steps.   Automobiles (with a digital disp lay) stores the  number of miles  driven.   Mobile devices stores the batter y level and reports it as a per centage.   Store shopping cards store the number of visits until you earn  a reward.   Video games store healt h, lives and scores.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students add a title and  instructions to the project.   Have students create a variable  for the LEDNumber and use the m iddle joystick button to control  which LED is being changed.      

15.   © education.makeblock.com      15   4. Challenge students to explore other blocks in the LED and Audio  categories in the Block Area. Some  blocks of interest may be:    5. Once they’ve explored the various blocks. Have students write p seudocode for an enhanced version of  the  Sound Machine  project.  6. Have students create their proje ct using their pseudocode as a  guide.  Wrap‐Up  [5 minutes]   Project Showcase  4. Group students into pairs and have students present their Cyber Pi Sound Machine to their  partner.   5. Have students ask each other  the following questions:  a. What feature of your project are you most proud of?  b. What was most challenging about this project?  Lesson Extension(s)   Program a stop button using the  Repeat Until block with the  blo ck.   Use the joystick buttons to prog ram multiple different sounds a nd light shows.      

56.   © education.makeblock.com      56   11. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect in Upload mode.  12. On the Panda sprite, in the  Block Area , click the  button. Find the  User cloud message  extension and click  +Add .  13. Instruct students to build the following scripts:  CyberPi   Sprite        14. Update the Wi‐Fi ssid and password with the information for the  wireless router in your location for  the CyberPi to connect.  15. Upload the program to the CyberPi and  test the program. Students should  observe Panda walk when the CyberPi is  shaken.  16. If the program does not appear to work,  add the following code to the CyberPi  script to troubleshoot the Wi‐Fi  connection.  Try It  [20 minutes]   Creating a Gift Alarm 

13.   © education.makeblock.com      13     Turns off all or an individual on‐ board LED.    2. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.  3. Remind students how to drag‐and‐drop blocks from the color‐code d categories in the Block Area.  Instruct them to build each  of the following scripts:    Note, the  middle pressed  option can be found on the drop‐down menu.    4. Test the program in Live mode and/or Upload mode.  5. Have students experiment with different values for the buzzer a nd LED blocks to observe how the  CyberPi performs.   6. Extension:  If time permits, teach  students about RGB color values. Or, all ow them to use a color picker  to identify the RGB valu es of specific colors.         Randomizing the Output   7. In the code above, a specific buz zer frequency and RGB color va lue were programmed in the code. The  CyberPi is repeating the same  sound and same LED color forever.  The following block can be used to  allow the program to select a random value each time the foreve r loop repeats.  Category   Block   Function 

50.   © education.makeblock.com      50   6. Instruct students to add the foll owing scripts to the program:    7. Now that the CyberPi is keeping  track of the score, add the fol lowing scripts to display the score on the  screen with button A is pressed:    8. Have students play the game and  see how many points they can ea rn.  Try It  [20 minutes]   Creating Strength Meter 2.0  3. With a simple version  of a Strength Meter ga me created, there a re many improvements that can be  added to the program. Have students identify areas of improveme nt for this design. Some ideas for  improvement include:  o Use the LED Strip to inform the user when the game is running.  o Add a sound effect each time a point is earned.  o Add a sound effect when time runs out.  o Add a title and instructions.  o Use the joystick and a variable t o change the difficulty of the  game (i.e., shaking strength for  easy is 30, medium is 50 and hard is 70).  2. Have students develop a plan and pseudocode for the improvement s they would like to add to their  project. 

51.   © education.makeblock.com      51   3. Have students create the  Strength Meter 2.0  using their pseudocode as a guide.  Wrap‐Up  [5 minutes]   Motion Sensing   3. The CyberPi has a 3‐axis gyrosco pe and a 3‐axis accelerometer w hich detects motion,  acceleration and  vibration. The shaking strength  block uses this component to de termine how strong the CyberPi is  being shaken. Have students brai nstorm a list of  devices they u se that use a gyroscope. Some examples  may include:   Mobile phones change the screen o rientation based on device rot ation.   Screens on mobile phones light u p when the device is picked up.    Video game controllers detect motion.   Robotic vacuums detect if they  have fallen or tipped over.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students program  the LEDs to progress ively light up based  on the strength (see example).   Have students program a 2‐player  game where it tracks a score f or both players, compares the  scores and declares a winner.      

32.   © education.makeblock.com      32   *Definitions from Code.org – CSD Unit 1  6. Have students switch roles every  3‐5 minutes during the portion  of the lesson.    Modify an Existing Project  7. Click  Tutorials  in the upper right corner. Select  Example Programs .  8. Choose the  Stage  label to see example programs programs for the Stage.  9. While pair programming, have students choose an example program  and modify the program scripts to  add a game controller.  Wrap‐Up  [5 minutes]   Respecting Intellectual Property  3. Discuss the impo rtance of respecting intellectual property and  providing credit to creators.  4. Have students add a comment to their project that provides cred it. To add a comment, right‐click on  the script area and select Add comment.    Lesson Extension(s)   Have students research intellect ual property, copyright, creati ve commons and citations.   Have students create a new game  that incorporates stage program ming and device  programming.   Have students add a title and ga me instructions to the project.       

24.   © education.makeblock.com      24    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐IC‐22  Collaborate with many contributo rs through strategies such as  crowdsourcing or surveys when cr eating a computational artifact . CSTA  2‐CS‐1  Recommend improvements to the de sign of computing devices, base d  on an analysis of how users interact with the devices.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 2‐3  Solicit and incorporate feedback f rom, and provide constructive   feedback to, team members and other stakeholders.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 3‐1  Identify complex, interdisciplinary, real‐world problems that c an be  solved computationally.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 5‐1  Plan the development of a comput ational artifact using an itera tive  process that includes reflection on and modification of the pla n, taking  into account key features, time and resource constraints, and u ser  expectations.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐1  Systematically test computational artifacts by considering all  scenarios  and using test cases.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐2  Identify and fix e rrors using a systematic process .  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐3  Evaluate and refine a computatio nal artifact mul tiple times to  enhance  its performance, reliability, u sability, and accessibility.      Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  15 minutes  Warm‐up   Collect Peer Feedback   20 minutes  Try It   Plan and Create Sound Recorder 3.0  10 minutes  Wrap‐up   Project Documentation   Lesson Extension(s)   Activities   Warm‐Up  [15 minutes]  

35.   © education.makeblock.com      35   27. Find a current event about smart home devices to present to the  class. Discuss how these solutions use  sensors to provide security, con venience and automation for con sumers.  Hands‐On [15 minutes]   Exploring Sensor Data  1. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.  2. Open the Lesson 6 – Sensor Meter  example project . Click the Gre en Flag to run the program. Observe  the values for the CyberPiVolu me and CyberPiLightIntensity.  3. Have students run the program and observe the sensor values and  graphing in differe nt scenarios, such  as:   CyberPi sitting on the desk   Covering up the CyberPi (light intensity should decrease)   Shining a flashlight on the CyberP i (light intensity should dec rease)   Trying to be as quiet as possi ble (volume should decrease)   Clapping or talking near the Cyb erPi (volume should increase)  4. Challenge students to determine  the minimum and maximum values  the sensors report to the  computer. Note, the Light sensor  and Sound sensor have a range  of 0 to 100.              5. Introduce students to the blocks  that are used for the sensors  on the CyberPi:  Category   Block Function      Stores a numerical value  representing the light intensity  detected by the light sensor on  the CyberPi.

54.   © education.makeblock.com      54    Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Internet of Things  31. Facilitate a short rese arch activity on the Internet of Things.  Have students research and present their  findings. Their research should  lead them to learn more about h ow internet‐connected physical  computing devices are used i n the following applications:  a. Smart Homes  b. Healthcare Monitoring  c. Transportation  d. Agriculture  e. Weather  f. Manufacturing  g. Environmental Research  h. Military    Hands‐On  [15 minutes]   Wireless Communication in mBlock  9. There are two types of wireless  communication in mBlock: Wi‐Fi  and LAN. Review the following  information and blocks for each type.  Wi‐Fi   Using a Wi‐Fi connection, data is shared with the cloud message  function. You can share data  across devices and projects with the same mBlock 5 account. Phy sical proximity or distance is  no longer a restriction, as these devices do not need to be in  the same location.    To use, each device must be connected to the internet. See the  blocks below for connecting the  CyberPi, Halocode and the mBlock project to cloud messages. Category   Block   Function     Connects the CyberPi to a wireless  network.    Returns TRUE if  the CyberPi is  connected to the internet.  Event block that triggers the  execution of the actions attached 

30.   © education.makeblock.com      30   Abstraction and Decomposition  6. Students will be using computational thinking strategies, abstr action and decomposition, to examine  the example projects and determine how to modify an existing ga me to add a CyberP i game controller.  They will use abstraction to igno re or filter out parts of the  program that are unnecessary to the  challenge and use decomposition  to break down the stage program ming and device programming parts  that are needed to cre ate the controller.  Term  Definition  abstraction  Simplify a problem by hiding , filtering out or ignoring unnecessary details. decomposition  Break a problem down into smaller pieces.   7. Instruct students to carefully e xamine their assigned game and  to complete the following challenge:  Game Controller   Problem  You are tasked with taking an existing program and adding a Cyb erPi  game controller. Use the example program to learn how to comple te  this task.  Challenge   Write a comprehensive explanation of how the CyberPi and the st age  interact in the example game.            Computational Thinking   Abstraction  Encourage students to use abstr action to filter out unnecessary   parts of the programs that are n ot interacting with the CyberPi .  Some examples include:    Space Game  o The Title, ball, asteroids and health sprites  o The background  o The “when I receive gameStart” scripts    Chase Game  o The Title and Bat sprites 

31.   © education.makeblock.com      31   o The background  o The “when I receive gameStart” scripts Decomposition   Encourage students to decompose the parts of the program. Be  sure students include  specifics such as:  o Which buttons on the CyberPi are being used?  o Which sprites are being controlled?  o How do the buttons on the CyberPi control the sprites?   8. Through the exercise ab ove, students should  have discovered the  following blocks:  Category   Block   Function      Send a message from one device,  sprite or background to another.  Used to synchronize actions.      Conditional Statement  Executes the actions nested inside  if a condition is met.        Used with a conditi onal statement  to detect whether the joystick is  pressed or moved by the user.     Try It  [20 minutes]   Pair Programming  5. Students will be working with a  partner to add a CyberPi game c ontroller to an existing project.  Introduce students to the Pair Programming roles:  Pair Programming   Navigator  Keeps track of the big picture a nd helps to decide what to do n ext.  Driver   The person using the comput er actually writing the code.

42.   © education.makeblock.com      42   When the joystick is pulled down: Decrease the red (R) value of all LEDs by 5 When the joystick is pulled right: Increase the green (G) value of all LEDs by 5 When the joystick is pulled left: Decrease the green (G) value of all LEDs by 5 When Button A is pressed: Increase the blue (B) value of all LEDs by 5 When Button B is pressed: Decrease the blue (B) value of all LEDs by 5   11. To program this project, a variable must be used to store the v alue of each of the LEDs. The variables  will start at zero (0) when the C yberPi starts and will be adju sted using the joystick or buttons.  12. Open the mBlock 5 software or  mBlock 5 Web version . Add the CyberPi in the  Devices tab and connect  in Live mode.  13. Go to the  Variables  section of the  Block Area . Click the  Make a Variable  button.  14. Name the new variable  redValue   and   leave  For all sprites  selected.  15. Introduce students to  the following new blo cks which are now av ailable in the  Variables  section:    Category   Block   Function      Sets a variable to a specific value.  Changes a variable by a specific  value (positive  or negative).    Returns the current value stored  in the variable.      Compares two values and  determines if the  first value is  less  than  the second value. Returns  TRUE or FALSE.    Compares two values and  determines if the  first value is 

17.   © education.makeblock.com      17    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐CS‐1  Recommend improvements to the de sign of computing devices, base d  on an analysis of how users interact with the devices.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 3‐1  Identify complex, interdisciplinary, real‐world problems that c an be  solved computationally.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 5‐1  Plan the development of a comput ational artifact using an itera tive  process that includes reflection on and modification of the pla n, taking  into account key features, time and resource constraints, and u ser  expectations.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐1  Systematically test computational artifacts by considering all  scenarios  and using test cases.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐2  Identify and fix e rrors using a systematic process .  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 6‐3  Evaluate and refine a computatio nal artifact multiple times to  enhance  its performance, reliability, u sability, and accessibility.      Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  10 minutes  Warm‐up   Evolving Computing Solutions  10 minutes  Hands‐on   Make a Plan   Create Sound Recorder 1.0  20 minutes  Try It   Plan and Create Sound Recorder 2.0  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Summarize   Lesson Extension(s)     Activities  

34.   © education.makeblock.com      34    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):   CyberPi – Lesson 6 – Sensor Meter     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐AP‐19  Document programs in order to ma ke them easier to follow, test,  and  debug.  CSTA  2‐CS‐03  Systematically identify and fix  problems with computing devices  and  their components.  ISTE  5b  Students collect data or identify  relevant data sets, use digit al tools to  analyze them, and represent data in various ways to facilitate  problem‐ solving and decision‐making.      Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Data and Society   15 minutes  Hands‐on   Exploring Sensor Data   Charting the Sound Sensor  20 minutes  Try It   Charting the Light Sensor  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Documentation   Lesson Extension(s)     Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Data and Society 

40.   © education.makeblock.com      40    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi  – Lesson 7 – Color Mixer   Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐CS‐02  Design projects that combine hardware and software components t o  collect and exchange data.  CSTA  2‐AP‐11  Create clearly named variables t hat represent different data ty pes and  perform operations on their values.  CSTA  2‐DA‐07  Represent data usin g multiple encoding schemes.      Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Conditional Statements Game   15 minutes  Hands‐on   Storing Data with a Variable   Using a Conditional Statement  20 minutes  Try It   Completing the Program  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Variables   Lesson Extension(s)      

29.   © education.makeblock.com      29   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Video Game Discussion  1. Have students discuss the following with a partner:   o Do you play video games? If so, how often?   o What device or video game system  do you prefer to play games on ?   o What’s your favorite v ideo game controller?   o What features make  it your favorite?   Hands‐On [15 minutes]   Explore Example Games  1. Assign students partners and determine who is Partner A and who  is Partner B.  2. Instruct each student to open the appropriate example project:  o Partner A   Lesson 5 – Chase Game  o Partner B   Lesson 5 – Space Adventure  3. Have students connect the CyberPi in Live mode and play the gam e.  4. Each project combines stage programming and device programming  to create an mBlock game that is  controlled by the CyberPi. Expla in the following to students:  Term  Definition  stage programming  Sequences of programming blocks that interact with the sprites  and background of the stage in mBlock.  device programming  Sequences of programming bloc ks that interact with the  physical computing device(s) connected in mBlock.       5. Have students examine their assi gned example program and differ entiate between the stage  programming and the device programming.  Note, device programming will be  on the device(s) listed on the  Devices tab and stage programming  will be on the sprites and backdrops listed on the Sprites and  Background tabs. 

53.   © education.makeblock.com      53    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    Two (2) CyberPi’s with USB‐C cable  or  One (1) CyberPi and One (1) Halocode   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi – Lesson 9 – Gift Alarm   Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐AP‐13  Decompose problems and subproblems into parts to facilitate the   design, implementation, and review of programs.  ISTE  5c  Students break problems into component parts, extra key informa tion,  and develop descriptive models  to understand complex systems or   facilitate problem‐solving. K12 CS  Framework  Practice 3‐1  Identify complex, interdisciplinary, real‐world problems that c an be  solved computationally.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 3‐2  Decompose complex real‐world pro blems into manageable subproble ms  that could integrate existing solutions or procedures.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 3‐3  Evaluate whether it is appropria te and feasible to solve a prob lem  computationally.      Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Internet of Things   15 minutes  Hands‐on   Wireless Communication in mBlock  20 minutes  Try It   Creating a Gift Alarm  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Brainstorming Ideas   Lesson Extension(s)      

47.   © education.makeblock.com      47    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi – Lesson 8 – Strength Meter   Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐CS‐02  Design projects that combine hardware and software components t o  collect and exchange data.  CSTA  2‐AP‐11  Create clearly named variables t hat represent different data ty pes and  perform operations on their values.     Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Variable Review   15 minutes  Hands‐on   Detecting Strength   Keeping Score  20 minutes  Try It   Creating Strength Meter 2.0  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Motion Sensing   Lesson Extension(s)      

16.   © education.makeblock.com      16       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Create a program in mBlock that  records and playbacks audio.   Follow an iterative process to develop a solution to a computin g problem.     Overview  By combining the speaker, microp hone and integrated storage, st udents will transform the  CyberPi into a pocket‐ sized audio recorder and playback device. Through an iterative  process, students will evaluate their projects and  improve their sound recorders.     Key Focus   Record audio with the CyberPi   Play recordings   Use an iterative design process    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):   CyberPi – Lesson 3 – Sound Record er 1    CyberPi – Lesson 3 – Sou nd Recorder 2  For the student:  Lesson 3  Sound Recorder 

9.   © education.makeblock.com      9    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐AP‐10  Use flowcharts and/or pseudocode  to address complex problems as   algorithms.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 5‐2  Create a computational artifact for practical intent, personal  expression,  or to address a societal issue.     Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Input vs. Output  15 minutes  Hands‐on   Plan a Program with Pseudocode   Write the Program   Randomizing the Output   Restart a CyberPi  20 minutes  Try It   Create a Sound Machine  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Project Showcase   Lesson Extension(s)    

23.   © education.makeblock.com      23       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Provide constructive feedbac k on a computing solution.   Modify an existing program t o improve user experience.   Follow an iterative process to develop a solution to a computin g problem.     Overview  Continuing with the Sound Recorder project, students will acqui re peer feedback and reflect on their initial  solution.  Then, students will pl an and create a feature‐rich,  sound recorder project.     Key Focus   Collect and evaluate peer feedback   Use an iterative design process    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi  – Lesson 2 – Sound Machine      For the student:  Lesson 4  Sound Recorder Iteration 

28.   © education.makeblock.com      28    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):   CyberPi – Lesson 5 – Chase Game    CyberPi – Lesson 5 – Space Adv entures     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  CSTA  2‐AP‐16  Incorporate existing code, media , and libraries into original p rograms,  and give attribution.  ISTE  2c  Students demonstrate an understan ding of and respect for the ri ghts  and obligations of using and sh aring intellectual property.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 4‐1  Identify complex, interdisciplinary, real‐world problems that c an be  solved computationally.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 7‐3  Articulate ideas responsibly by observing intellectual property  rights and  giving appropriate attribution.     Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Video Game Discussion  15 minutes  Hands‐on   Explore Example Games   Abstraction and Decomposition   20 minutes  Try It   Pair Programming   Modify an Example Project  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Respecting Intellectual Property   Lesson Extension(s)       Activities  

1.   © education.makeblock.com      1       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Identify key features of the CyberPi.   Connect a CyberPi to a comput er using mBlock software.   Examine example programs for the  CyberPi using the mBlock softw are.     Overview  Meet the CyberPi, a feature‐rich micro‐controller with a pletho ra of sensors, buttons and a full‐color screen  display. Discover a variety of key features of CyberPi through  an exploration of sample programs in mBlock.      Key Focus   Components and features of the CyberPi   Navigate mBlock software   Establish a connection between  the software and hardware    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s) incl uded in mBlock software    For the student:  Lesson 1  Meet the CyberPi 

25.   © education.makeblock.com      25   Collect Peer Feedback  6. With the entire class, conduct a  formal peer review and feedbac k activity. Explain how software  developers rely on user feedback, reviews and data to plan for  additional iterations of a computing  solution.  7. Have students place their plan f or Sound Recorder 2.0 on their  desk, open the program in mBlock  and place the CyberPi with the  uploaded recorder on their desk.   8. As time permits, have students r otate around the  room and provi de feedback on their classmates  projects. Some guiding questions for feedback may include:  a. What feature do you like best about their project?  b. Were instructions clear on how to use their recorder? Did you h ave to guess or make any  assumptions on how to use it?  c. Is there anything they could add  to their project to make it mo re user‐friendly?  d. Is there a feature you think wou ld enhance their recorder proje ct?  Try It [20 minutes]   Plan and Create Sound Recorder 3.0  1. Have students review the feedback  they received and to brainsto rm a list of ideas for  Sound  Recorder 3.0 . Some ideas for improvements:  o Include a title that appears when the CyberPi starts.  o Change the colors of the on‐screen text.  o Set a specific duration for the recording instead of using a st op button.  o Use the joystick to control the  volume and/or playback speed.  o Display the current volume level  on the screen or use the LED s trip to indicate the volume.  o Have the LED strip animate while recording.  o Use the joystick to control the  duration of the recording by st oring the recording duration  in a variable.  2. Following the steps from the pre vious lesson, have students ide ntify improvements, write  pseudocode and create their  Sound Recorder 3.0 project.  Wrap‐Up  [10 minutes]  

52.   © education.makeblock.com      52       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Use wireless network technology  to communicate between computin g devices.   Solve a problem using a computational solution.   Identify uses for wireless communication.     Overview  Students will use the CyberPi to create a program which detects  whether or not a friend has shaken their birthday  present. Through the use of wire less communication, students wi ll send messages between computing devices,  allowing one device to control another.     Key Focus   Using wireless networks   Communicating between devices    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    Two (2) CyberPi’s with USB‐C cable  or  One (1) CyberPi and One (1) Halocode   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi – Lesson 9 – Gift Alarm        For the student:  Lesson 9  Gift Alarm 

46.   © education.makeblock.com      46       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Write a program in mBlock that keeps score.   Write a program that executes actions for a specified amount of  time.   Display text on the Cyberpi display.     Overview  In this lesson, students will create a fun game with the CyberP i where the player shakes the CyberPi for ten  seconds. The students will progr am the game to keep score of ho w many times the shaking strength is greater  than 50.     Key Focus   Keeping score   Using the CyberPi Timer   Displaying text on the CyberPi display    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi – Lesson 8 – Strength Meter      For the student:  Lesson 8  Strength Meter 

39.   © education.makeblock.com      39       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Use a variable to store a value.   Change a variable based on user input.   Write a program in mBlock that executes a program if a conditio n is met.     Overview  Students will be introduced to va riables to create a CyberPi Co lor Mixer. This program wi ll use the joystick and  buttons to control the R, G, B c olor values of all of the on‐bo ard LEDs. Then, students  will use conditional  statements to ensure that the R, G, B values do not go out‐of‐r ange.     Key Focus   Storing data with variables   Using conditional statements    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s): CyberPi – Lesson 7 – Color Mixer      For the student:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version   Lesson 7  Color Mixer 

8.   © education.makeblock.com      8       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Identify CyberPi’s input(s) and output(s).   Write pseudocode to plan and d esign a program in mBlock.   Create a program in mBlock using  the CyberPi buttons to trigger  events.   Select and use programming blocks to control the speaker and LE D strip.     Overview  In this lesson, students create a disco party using the on‐boar d LEDs and speaker. This program will use the CyberPi  buttons to trigger events and run scripts. Students will also p rogram a button to stop al l sounds and lights, as well  as a button to restart the CyberPi.     Key Focus   Input and Output components on the CyberPi   Writing Psuedocode   Creating a program in mBlock    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):  CyberPi  – Lesson 2 – Sound Machine  For the student:  Lesson 2  Sound Machine 

18.   © education.makeblock.com      18   Warm‐Up  [10 minutes]   Evolving Computing Solutions  6. Discuss with students how comput ing solves everyday, real‐world  problems. As a class,  compile a list of  computing solutions that student s and their fam ilies come acros s on a daily basis.  Some examples may  include:  a. Smartphone  b. Alarm Clock  c. Refrigerator Alarm  d. Automobiles  e. Public Transit  f. GPS  g. Microwave  h. Weather Report or App  7. Discuss with students how comput ing solutions have evolved over  time.  Here is a specific example you may want to share:  Evolution of Direction s to a Destination    o Using a printed road map or tran sit map to determine a route fr om one place to  another prior to departure.  o Using a website on a computer to  generate printable directions  prior to  departure. (i.e. Mapques t or a transit website)  o Using a mobile device to view a  website with dir ections while i n route.  o Using a mobile device to view a map while in route (no directio ns provided).  (Note, this was the first iterat ion of the Google Maps app; it  had no directions.)  o Using a mobile device to view a  map with driving directions or  transit directions.  o Using a mobile device to provide turn‐by‐turn GPS driving direc tions (no transit or  walking support, yet).  o Using a mobile device to provide turn‐by‐turn GPS driving direc tions with route  adjustments based on live traffic data.  o Using a mobile device to provide  GPS‐assisted dr iving, walking,  or transit  directions in real‐time.    The use of GPS directions on a s martphone or mobile device has  evolved over time. For  example, the first iteration of  Google Maps was missing many ke y features (i.e., walking  directions, public transit, live  traffic, road closures, destin ation information, etc.) which  have been added over time through evaluation of the solution, u ser feedback and data  collection.    Hands‐On  [10 minutes]   Make a Plan 

27.   © education.makeblock.com      27       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Differentiate between stage progr amming and device programming.    Examine and describe how an existing project functions.   Create a program in mBlock using  the CyberPi to control sprites .   Modify an existing program.     Overview  In this lesson, students will turn the CyberPi into a game cont roller by combining devic e programming and stage  programming in mBlock. Students  will examine example programs t o discover how the CyberPi can control the  movement of a sprite. Then, through pair programming, students  will modify an existing game to program a  CyberPi game controller.     Key Focus   Combine stage programming and device programming   Pair Programming   Decomposition and abstraction    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):   CyberPi – Lesson 5 – Chase Game    CyberPi – Lesson 5 – Space Adv entures  For the student:  Lesson 5  Game Controller 

33.   © education.makeblock.com      33       Subject:   Computer Science  Grade(s):   6‐12   Duration:   45 Minutes   Difficulty:    Beginner       Objectives   By the end of this lesson, s tudents will be able to:   Describe how CyberPi s ensors detect the surrounding environment .   Debug errors in programs in mBlock.   Document a program using comments in mBlock.     Overview  Discover how the on‐board sensors on the CyberPi represent loud ness and light intensi ty of the surrounding  environment. Students will learn  about data representation and  graphing of sensors values.     Key Focus   Data representation   Debugging programs   Understanding sensors    Pre‐lesson Checklist  For the teacher:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s):   CyberPi – Lesson 6 – Sensor Meter    CyberPi – Lesson 6 – Sensor  Meter V2    For the student:   Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version   Lesson 6  Sensor Meter 

41.   © education.makeblock.com      41    Activities   Warm‐Up  [5 minutes]   Conditional Statements Game  28. Play a game similar to Simon Says with your class to demonstrat e conditional statements. With your  students, read each statement below and have the students obey  the command. (Feel free to write  your own commands for your students.)   o IF  your name has the letter “S” in it,  THEN  raise your hand.  o IF  you have a pet cat,  THEN  clap your hands.  o IF  you play a sport,  THEN  stomp your feet.  o IF  you are wearing socks,  THEN  touch your feet.  o IF  your favorite ice cream is chocolate,  THEN  say “Yum.”  29. Share with students that these commands are examples of conditi onal statements. In programming,  conditional statements are used t o perform specific actions if  a condition is true.  Hands‐On [15 minutes]   Storing Data with a Variable  9. Discuss the following defi nition with the students:  Term  Definition* variable  A placeholder for a piece of information that can change.  *Definitions from Co de.org – CSD Unit 1    10. Review the following challenge and pseudocode with the students :  Color Mixer   Project  Description   Create a project where the joyst ick and buttons on the CyberPi  control  the R, G, B values of all of the LEDs. Pseudocode   When the joystick is pulled up: Increase the red (R) value of all LEDs by 5

2.   © education.makeblock.com      2    Computer with mBlock 5 installed or  mBlock Web version    CyberPi with USB‐C cable   Pocket Shield (optional)   Example program(s) incl uded in mBlock software     Content Standards   Type  Indicator  Standard  ISTE  6a  Students choose the appropriate p latforms and tools for meeting  the  desired objectives of their  creation of communication.  K12 CS  Framework  Practice 2‐1  Cultivate working relationships with individuals possessing div erse  perspectives, sills, and personalities.     Agenda (45 minutes)   Duration  Content  5 minutes  Warm‐up   Meet the CyberPi  15 minutes  Hands‐on   Tour of mBlock 5   Connect the CyberPi  o Add the CyberPi Extension  o Test Live Mode   Explore an Example Program  o Test Upload Mode  20 minutes  Try It   Explore Example Programs  5 minutes  Wrap‐up   Reflect on the CyberPi Features and Capabilities   Brainstorm Ideas for CyberPi Programs   Lesson Extension(s)    

4.   © education.makeblock.com      4   Name of Area  Function  Menu Bar   Select language   Create, open or save the file   Find an example program, help file, etc. Stage Area   View the project stage   Select and edit sprites and backgrounds   Connect hardware devices Block Area   Find and select script blocks organized into  color‐coded categories   Find and add extensions  Script Area   Combine blocks to create programs or scripts   Drag blocks and arrange them in a certain order to control  sprites, backgrounds and/or devices   Connect the CyberPi  3. Plug the CyberPi into the comput er using the included cable.  The CyberPi should boot up and th e screen will display either  the last program upload ed or the Home menu.  4. On the  Devices  tab in mBlock, click the  Add  button. Select  CyberPi  and click  Ok .  5. Click the  Connect  button. Then, select the USB port and click  Connect .  6. If connected successfu lly, the button will  change to Disconnect . 

6.   © education.makeblock.com      6    CyberPi can be disconnected from the computer   mBlock software may be closed   Program will remain on CyberP i until a new program is  uploaded in its place    17. Switch the CyberPi to  Upload  mode and click the  Upload  button.  18. The  Upload Progress  window will appear and will dis appear when uploa ding is comple te. The CyberPi  will reboot and observe the  Rainbow Lights  program. Every time the CyberPi starts up, the  Rainbow  Lights  program will run.     Try It  [20 minutes]   Explore Example Programs  1. Instruct students to explore 3 of  the remainder of the example  programs included with mBlock. Some  suggestions include:  o Buzzer  o Twinkle Twinkle Little Star  o Voice Reactive Lights  o Trigger Reminder  o Simple Timer  o Step Counter  o Motion‐sensing Chart  2. While they review the projects, have them document the followin g for each program they explore:  o Write a description of the program.  o Identify which components of the CyberPi are used for each task  of the program.  o Make inferences about what porti ons of the project code does.  Wrap‐Up  [5 minutes]   Reflection & Brainstorming 

5.   © education.makeblock.com      5   Not Connected        Connected         7. Notice, the CyberPi is connected in  Live  mode. Let’s test the connection.  8. In the  Block Area , choose the  LED  category.  9. Click the  block. Observe the Cyb erPi as the LED strip displays  the colors  indicated.  Explore Example Programs  10. Click  Tutorials  in the upper right corner. Select  Example Programs .  11. Choose the  CyberPi  label to see example programs for the CyberPi.  12. Find and select the  Rainbow Lights  program.  13. Have students read the code an d predict what will happen.  14. Connect the CyberPi in  Live  mode.  15. Click the  block. Observe the Cyb erPi as the LED strip displays  the colors  indicated. (Note, a glowing yello w border surrounds the script  in the Script area indicating the script is  running.) Click the block s to stop the program.  16. Explain to students the difference between  Live  mode and  Upload  mode.    Mode  Description Live Mode   Program is run by the computer (is not stored on the  CyberPi)   CyberPi must remain connected to the computer   mBlock project must remain open   Must be used for stage programming  Upload Mode   Program is uploaded and stored on the CyberPi   No communication w ith the computer 

Views

  • 69 Total Views
  • 55 Website Views
  • 14 Embeded Views

Actions

  • 0 Social Shares
  • 0 Likes
  • 0 Dislikes
  • 0 Comments

Share count

  • 0 Facebook
  • 0 Twitter
  • 0 LinkedIn
  • 0 Google+

Embeds 1

  • 2 51.83.143.171